Difference between revisions of "Mount Bishop"

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| Coordinates (NAD 27)={{coord|10U|505372|5475092|NAD27|hidedatum}}  
 
| Coordinates (NAD 27)={{coord|10U|505372|5475092|NAD27|hidedatum}}  
 
| NTS Topographic map={{NTS link|092|G|07}}
 
| NTS Topographic map={{NTS link|092|G|07}}
| QuickInfo=Mt Bishop is tucked behind Mt. Seymour and Mt Elsay in the North Shore, and is the biggest of the three (only slightly).It is a long (but epic!) day trip from Vancouver. You can take a bus (#209 or 210) from downtown to near the entrance of the lower Seymour Conservation Reserve. Then you can cycle to the trailhead (it is nearly 13km from the entrance to the park to the trailhead so biking is the only good option.) You can ride the Seymour Valley Trailway to the Hydraulic Connector at the 6km mark. You then descend the Hydraulic Connector and cross the Seymour River over the Spur 4 Bridge. Then continue on the Spur 4 Road to about the 12.5 km mark (as marked by signs on the road, not on the park map) where you will see some flagging on your right. Both roads are well graded so at this point even a bike with slick skinny tires would be OK, but you might be more comfortable on a bike with fatter tires.  
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| QuickInfo=Mt Bishop is tucked behind Mt. Seymour and Mt Elsay in the North Shore, and is the biggest of the three (only slightly).
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It is a long (but epic!) day trip from Vancouver. You can take a bus (#209 or 210) from downtown to near the entrance of the lower Seymour Conservation Reserve. Then you can cycle to the trailhead (it is nearly 13km from the entrance to the park to the trailhead so biking is the only good option.) You can ride the Seymour Valley Trailway to the Hydraulic Connector at the 6km mark. You then descend the Hydraulic Connector and cross the Seymour River over the Spur 4 Bridge. Then continue on the Spur 4 Road to about the 12.5 km mark (as marked by signs on the road, not on the park map) where you will see some flagging on your right. Both roads are well graded so at this point even a bike with slick skinny tires would be OK, but you might be more comfortable on a bike with fatter tires.  
  
 
There is lots of flagging on the area of the trailhead so it will be helpful to try and spot a triangular orange trail marker nailed to a tree. This marks the beginning of the trail.  
 
There is lots of flagging on the area of the trailhead so it will be helpful to try and spot a triangular orange trail marker nailed to a tree. This marks the beginning of the trail.  

Latest revision as of 19:24, 14 April 2019

Mount Bishop Region South Coast
Mount Bishop.jpg
The southern flank of Mount Bishop rising almost a kilometre above Elsay Lake. At the left of the photo, the small treed summit is Vicar Peak, the northern end of Elsay ridge.
Elevation 1509 m (4951 ft)
Coordinates
Quick Info Mt Bishop is tucked behind Mt. Seymour and Mt Elsay in the North Shore, and is the biggest of the three (only slightly).

It is a long (but epic!) day trip from Vancouver. You can take a bus (#209 or 210) from downtown to near the entrance of the lower Seymour Conservation Reserve. Then you can cycle to the trailhead (it is nearly 13km from the entrance to the park to the trailhead so biking is the only good option.) You can ride the Seymour Valley Trailway to the Hydraulic Connector at the 6km mark. You then descend the Hydraulic Connector and cross the Seymour River over the Spur 4 Bridge. Then continue on the Spur 4 Road to about the 12.5 km mark (as marked by signs on the road, not on the park map) where you will see some flagging on your right. Both roads are well graded so at this point even a bike with slick skinny tires would be OK, but you might be more comfortable on a bike with fatter tires.

There is lots of flagging on the area of the trailhead so it will be helpful to try and spot a triangular orange trail marker nailed to a tree. This marks the beginning of the trail.

The trail ascends up to Vicar Lakes, and is very steep, but features many fixed lines where needed. There is no exposure in the steep parts so it feels safe enough.

A well flagged trail into the alpine leaves from the largest of the Vicar Lakes, but the flagging stops at the Alpine where you can choose your own route to scramble up.